Copyright © Bouvard Coast Care Group Inc - Registered Not for Profit Organisation
Designed by Westcountry
Bouvard Coast Care Group
Working for the future to protect our coastal dune system, fauna and wildlife

Our Groups

We have a number of special interest groups who look after specific areas of Coast Care, these include our Turtle Group who tend for the needs of turtles washed up on the coast during bad weather and our Possum Group who manage the possum bridges and wildlife corridors. If you’d like to take part in one of these groups, email the group leader using the details on their page, you’ll find a summary of our special interest groups below.

Possum Group

Our Possum Group look after the Western Ring-tail Possums and the Gumnut Possum Bridge. The western ringtail possum (Ngwayir) is an arboreal leaf-eating herbivorous marsupial endemic to south-western Australia. Since colonial settlement it has undergone a substantial range contraction, with declines in abundance and habitat continuing. It is listed as threatened fauna, and ranked in Western Australia as Endangered under international (IUCN) criteria.  It is also listed nationally as Vulnerable under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act). Bouvard Coastcare Group in partnership with the City of Mandurah and Friends of Warrangup Springs successfully applied for funding to the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council for “Restoring Ecological Linkages for the Ngwayir (Western Ringtail Possum)” In addition, we have also carried out planting along a number of wildlife corridors in Bouvard to provide food & habitat for the Western Ring-tailed Possum. The Possum Group carry on this work, managing, maintaining and monitoring possum numbers in the area. You can join this group by visiting their group page.
BOUVARD COASTCARE POSSUM GROUP BOUVARD COASTCARE TURTLE GROUP

Turtle Group

Our Turtle Group look after sea turtles. Six of the world’s seven species of turtles are found in WA waters:     green     hawksbill     loggerhead     flatback     leatherback     olive ridley. All marine turtles in Australian waters are protected species at both State and Commonwealth levels.     Marine turtles have existed in the world's oceans for more than 100 million years.     These ancient mariners have cultural, spiritual and economic importance to coastal Indigenous Australians.     Turtles feature in many stories, ceremonies, traditions and contemporary activities of Indigenous people, and are often a food source in remote coastal communities. Marine turtles generally live for a long time and are slow to reach sexual maturity—it can take between 20 and 50 years for a turtle to begin to breed. The only time they leave the ocean is when the adult females lay their eggs on beaches, and occasionally to bask during the nesting season. ( Read more on the DBCA Website ) The aim of our Turtle Group is to encourage members and their families to monitor andprotect sea turtles especially young turtles that have been washed up on our coastline during storms. Find out how you can help on our Turtle Group page.
Visit The Turtle Group Visit The Turtle Group Visit The Possum Group Visit The Possum Group
Copyright © Bouvard Coast Care Group Inc - Registered Not for Profit Organisation
Designed by Westcountry
Bouvard Coast Care Group
Working for the future to protect our coastal dune system, fauna and wildlife

Our Groups

We have a number of special interest groups who look after specific areas of Coast Care, these include our Turtle Group who tend for the needs of turtles washed up on the coast during bad weather and our Possum Group who manage the possum bridges and wildlife corridors. If you’d like to take part in one of these groups, email the group leader using the details on their page, you’ll find a summary of our special interest groups below.

Possum Group

Our Possum Group look after the Western Ring-tail Possums and the Gumnut Possum Bridge. The western ringtail possum (Ngwayir) is an arboreal leaf-eating herbivorous marsupial endemic to south- western Australia. Since colonial settlement it has undergone a substantial range contraction, with declines in abundance and habitat continuing. It is listed as threatened fauna, and ranked in Western Australia as Endangered under international (IUCN) criteria.  It is also listed nationally as Vulnerable under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act). Bouvard Coastcare Group in partnership with the City of Mandurah and Friends of Warrangup Springs successfully applied for funding to the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council for “Restoring Ecological Linkages for the Ngwayir (Western Ringtail Possum)” In addition, we have also carried out planting along a number of wildlife corridors in Bouvard to provide food & habitat for the Western Ring-tailed Possum. The Possum Group carry on this work, managing, maintaining and monitoring possum numbers in the area. You can join this group by visiting their group page.

Turtle Group

Our Turtle Group look after sea turtles. Six of the world’s seven species of turtles are found in WA waters:     green     hawksbill     loggerhead     flatback     leatherback     olive ridley. All marine turtles in Australian waters are protected species at both State and Commonwealth levels.     Marine turtles have existed in the world's oceans for more than 100 million years.     These ancient mariners have cultural, spiritual and economic importance to coastal Indigenous Australians.     Turtles feature in many stories, ceremonies, traditions and contemporary activities of Indigenous people, and are often a food source in remote coastal communities. Marine turtles generally live for a long time and are slow to reach sexual maturity—it can take between 20 and 50 years for a turtle to begin to breed. The only time they leave the ocean is when the adult females lay their eggs on beaches, and occasionally to bask during the nesting season. ( Read more on the DBCA Website ) The aim of our Turtle Group is to encourage members and their families to monitor andprotect sea turtles especially young turtles that have been washed up on our coastline during storms. Find out how you can help on our Turtle Group page.
Visit The Turtle Group Visit The Turtle Group Visit The Possum Group Visit The Possum Group