Copyright © Bouvard Coast Care Group Inc - Registered Not for Profit Organisation
Designed by Westcountry
Bouvard Coast Care Group
Working for the future to protect our coastal dune system, fauna and wildlife

Peacock Spider Group

By Carole Anderson - BCCG Member &  Group Sponsor I must first explain that I am only an amateur on spiders and have only recently taken up the interest so am prepared to stand corrected but it was I who collected specimens of this species for Jurgen Otto to take back to Sydney so as they could be described and given a name. I have also been taking photos of them at every opportunity and I have discovered that this particular species seems to be around for most of the year where as some of the others are only found in spring. Maratus flavus ( flavus meaning yellow in Latin) is the name given to the Peacock Spider that is described in Peckhamia 160.1 by J C Otto and D E Hill and is unique to this area of the South-west of Western Australia known as Tims Thicket. It is important to preserve this area as it may be the only place in the world that this species exists.     This is the area in Tims Thicket where Maratus flavus is found:
BOUVARD COASTCARE PEACOCK SPIDER GROUP

You can join this group by contacting: Carole  spiders@bouvardcoastcare.org.au 

Photos by Carole Anderson and Jurgen Otto ©  https://www.peacockspider.org/
Males are only about 4mm and females about 5mm. They are found in leaf litter and on small green plants not very tall in height. They feed on small live insects and catch them by jumping on them. They do not build webs like other spiders. In late winter into spring the male displays (dances) to the female to get her approval to mate. It can go on for quite awhile before she lets him. The female makes a nest of silk and lays her eggs in a small silk cocoon and the spiderlings take about 4-5 weeks to emerge. She stays in the nest with the eggs until they hatch and does not eat in that time.   All species of Peacock Spider are only found in Australia and to date there are 70 different species of which most are in Western Australia and over half of them in the South-west of the state. Maratus flavus has been photographed by others before me but had never been described (named) until February 2018. 
Here is a video from YouTube by Jurgen Otto  https://www.peacockspider.org/
Adult gravid (pregnant) female Aug 2018 Juvenile male Aug 2018 Juvenile showing it’s eyes Aug 2018 Juvenile July 2018 Male raising its third legs in a display to a female July 2018 Male displaying June 2018 Male Aug 2018 Juvenile female July 2018 Spiderling at 2 days old Dec 2017
If you’d like to find out more about this rare spider why not join the Bouvard Coast Care Peacock Spider Group (it’s free!) by emailing Carole at spiders@bouvardcoastcare.org.au  You will find a wealth of information on Jurgen Otto’s website and Facebook page
Copyright © Bouvard Coast Care Group Inc - Registered Not for Profit Organisation
Designed by Westcountry
Bouvard Coast Care Group
Working for the future to protect our coastal dune system, fauna and wildlife

Peacock Spider Group

By Carole Anderson - BCCG Member &  Group Sponsor I must first explain that I am only an amateur on spiders and have only recently taken up the interest so am prepared to stand corrected but it was I who collected specimens of this species for Jurgen Otto to take back to Sydney so as they could be described and given a name. I have also been taking photos of them at every opportunity and I have discovered that this particular species seems to be around for most of the year where as some of the others are only found in spring. Maratus flavus ( flavus meaning yellow in Latin) is the name given to the Peacock Spider that is described in Peckhamia 160.1 by J C Otto and D E Hill and is unique to this area of the South-west of Western Australia known as Tims Thicket. It is important to preserve this area as it may be the only place in the world that this species exists.     This is the area in Tims Thicket where Maratus flavus is found:

You can join this group by

contacting: Carole  

spiders@bouvardcoastcare.org.au 

Photos by Carole Anderson and Jurgen Otto ©  https://www.peacockspider.org/
Males are only about 4mm and females about 5mm. They are found in leaf litter and on small green plants not very tall in height. They feed on small live insects and catch them by jumping on them. They do not build webs like other spiders. In late winter into spring the male displays (dances) to the female to get her approval to mate. It can go on for quite awhile before she lets him. The female makes a nest of silk and lays her eggs in a small silk cocoon and the spiderlings take about 4-5 weeks to emerge. She stays in the nest with the eggs until they hatch and does not eat in that time.   All species of Peacock Spider are only found in Australia and to date there are 70 different species of which most are in Western Australia and over half of them in the South-west of the state. Maratus flavus has been photographed by others before me but had never been described (named) until February 2018. 
Adult gravid (pregnant) female Aug 2018 Juvenile male Aug 2018 Juvenile showing it’s eyes Aug 2018 Juvenile July 2018 Male raising its third legs in a display to a female July 2018 Male displaying June 2018 Male Aug 2018 Juvenile female July 2018 Spiderling at 2 days old Dec 2017
If you’d like to find out more about this rare spider why not join the Bouvard Coast Care Peacock Spider Group (it’s free!) by emailing Carole at spiders@bouvardcoastcare.org.au  You will find a wealth of information on Jurgen Otto’s website and Facebook page