Copyright © Bouvard Coast Care Group Inc - Registered Not for Profit Organisation
Designed by Westcountry
Bouvard Coast Care Group
Working for the future to protect our coastal dune system, fauna and wildlife

What We Do

Planting & Brushing The single most important preventive measure and management tool available to coastal rehabilitation is the retention of vegetation.  Plants over time die off, they may become susceptible to disease, or die from lack of water or old age.  Small gaps in vegetation allow for the emergence of new growth and increase plant vigour and diversity.  In a coastal environment, small gaps however can have major impacts where erosion becomes the dominating vector.  For this reason, the group employs two methods to sustain plant growth, by planting additional plants where needed, and by "brushing" the bare sand.  "Brushing" means placing plant loppings on the surface of the sand. This has 4 measurable impacts, it slows down erosion by trapping windborne sand in the brush, it also traps windborne seed as well, and finally brings the moisture level in the soil closer to the soil surface by decreasing evaporation. Additionally it presents a visual clue to deter pedestrian and vehicle traffic from the rehab area to aid the emergence of small plants and encourage their growth. Monitor the Coast The group has over the past 20+ years maintained a photographic record of the areas of concern within our area of operation.  We have monitored those areas that have been rehabilitated to determine any ongoing issues, and where appropriate employ differing tactics to maintain and continue rehabilitation efforts. Monitoring has taken the form of photographing temporal changes, two differing occasions of airborne video (vertical and oblique), an honours study into the evaluation of differing rehabilitation techniques undertaken in 2001 by Barbara Muhling, and annual revisions of air photos for focus studies of erosion prone areas. Monitoring of rehab areas for weed invasion and removal. In concert with the landholders review management plans for the coastal reserves and National Park. Reporting Problems The BCCG members keep an eye out for the following:   o Litter  o  Illegal vehicle access anywhere on the dunes or the beach north of  Tim’s Thicket.   o Coastal erosion and vegetation degradation. Applying for Grants The BCCG committee has been responsible for securing large amounts of  grant funding which have enabled us to complete some significant projects in  collaboration with the Mandurah City Council which include:  o Seedling purchases  o Provision of hard coastal access paths  o Beach amenities and  a toilet block  o Seating and picnic tables  o Signage to inform the public  o Significant areas of dunal rehabilitation.  o Ongoing access to selective green waste disposal for residents. Maintain the Dunes The maritime environment is a highly dynamic one and with increasing variations in climate change, present a set of unique and variable conditions. The coastal dunes provide the first line defence for changing environmental conditions at the sea/land interface.  Sand dunes are rarely stable environments, over even short time frames, and with the increasing encroachment of housing  in the northern areas, provide opportunities for clashes of culture and environment.  We enjoy living next to the beach with the recreational opportunities it provides, but barely consider the downsides of such living, such as high wind pressure environments, highly corrosive environments, erosion, and storm damage etc.  Opportunities to minimise these downsides are intrinsically woven into the stability of coastal dunes, and in turn, dunal stability is dependant on its covering vegetation. By maintaining a healthy vigorous vegetation on dunes we enhance the protective opportunities they present, such as reducing salt spray, reducing wind speed, trapping wind borne sand, and reducing beach erosion. Improve Facilities The group provides an opportunity for residents and others to improve facilities within the area by acting as a conduit to the present landholders. The group has provided the installation of lookouts and pathways to enhance opportunities for people to enjoy the environs without additional damage to the area. We have secured additional facilities such as a toilet block in the more remote localities like Tims Thicket,  and seats and picnic tables to enhance the recreational experiences. Help to maintain the visual environment by taking your rubbish home with you or dispose of it in the proper bins. We actively advocate to local governments for improvement of, and addition of, facilities in the area. Prevent Erosion Preventing erosion is everybody’s responsibility and you can do your bit: Where possible transit rehabilitation areas using existing defined pathways. Prevent the removal of vegetation by not lighting fires on the beach. Only use 4WD vehicles on designated tracks, and the beach itself south of Tims Thicket. When using 4WD's deflate your tyres to correct sand pressures for your vehicle to prevent track damage. Do not ride trail bikes or quad vehicles in the dunal areas, and report these illegal activities promptly to City of Mandurah, or DPAW, rangers.
Copyright © Bouvard Coast Care Group Inc - Registered Not for Profit Organisation
Designed by Westcountry

What We Do

Planting & Brushing The single most important preventive measure and management tool available to coastal rehabilitation is the retention of vegetation.  Plants over time die off, they may become susceptible to disease, or die from lack of water or old age.  Small gaps in vegetation allow for the emergence of new growth and increase plant vigour and diversity.  In a coastal environment, small gaps however can have major impacts where erosion becomes the dominating vector.  For this reason, the group employs two methods to sustain plant growth, by planting additional plants where needed, and by "brushing" the bare sand.  "Brushing" means placing plant loppings on the surface of the sand. This has 4 measurable impacts, it slows down erosion by trapping windborne sand in the brush, it also traps windborne seed as well, and finally brings the moisture level in the soil closer to the soil surface by decreasing evaporation. Additionally it presents a visual clue to deter pedestrian and vehicle traffic from the rehab area to aid the emergence of small plants and encourage their growth. Monitor the Coast The group has over the past 20+ years maintained a photographic record of the areas of concern within our area of operation.  We have monitored those areas that have been rehabilitated to determine any ongoing issues, and where appropriate employ differing tactics to maintain and continue rehabilitation efforts. Monitoring has taken the form of photographing temporal changes, two differing occasions of airborne video (vertical and oblique), an honours study into the evaluation of differing rehabilitation techniques undertaken in 2001 by Barbara Muhling, and annual revisions of air photos for focus studies of erosion prone areas. Monitoring of rehab areas for weed invasion and removal. In concert with the landholders review management plans for the coastal reserves and National Park. Reporting Problems The BCCG members keep an eye out for the following:   o Litter  o  Illegal vehicle access anywhere on the dunes or the beach north of  Tim’s Thicket.   o Coastal erosion and vegetation degradation. Applying for Grants The BCCG committee has been responsible for securing large amounts of  grant funding which have enabled us to complete some significant projects in  collaboration with the Mandurah City Council which include:  o Seedling purchases  o Provision of hard coastal access paths  o Beach amenities and  a toilet block  o Seating and picnic tables  o Signage to inform the public  o Significant areas of dunal rehabilitation.  o Ongoing access to selective green waste disposal for residents. Maintain the Dunes The maritime environment is a highly dynamic one and with increasing variations in climate change, present a set of unique and variable conditions. The coastal dunes provide the first line defence for changing environmental conditions at the sea/land interface.  Sand dunes are rarely stable environments, over even short time frames, and with the increasing encroachment of housing  in the northern areas, provide opportunities for clashes of culture and environment.  We enjoy living next to the beach with the recreational opportunities it provides, but barely consider the downsides of such living, such as high wind pressure environments, highly corrosive environments, erosion, and storm damage etc.  Opportunities to minimise these downsides are intrinsically woven into the stability of coastal dunes, and in turn, dunal stability is dependant on its covering vegetation. By maintaining a healthy vigorous vegetation on dunes we enhance the protective opportunities they present, such as reducing salt spray, reducing wind speed, trapping wind borne sand, and reducing beach erosion. Improve Facilities The group provides an opportunity for residents and others to improve facilities within the area by acting as a conduit to the present landholders. The group has provided the installation of lookouts and pathways to enhance opportunities for people to enjoy the environs without additional damage to the area. We have secured additional facilities such as a toilet block in the more remote localities like Tims Thicket,  and seats and picnic tables to enhance the recreational experiences. Help to maintain the visual environment by taking your rubbish home with you or dispose of it in the proper bins. We actively advocate to local governments for improvement of, and addition of, facilities in the area. Prevent Erosion Preventing erosion is everybody’s responsibility and you can do your bit: Where possible transit rehabilitation areas using existing defined pathways. Prevent the removal of vegetation by not lighting fires on the beach. Only use 4WD vehicles on designated tracks, and the beach itself south of Tims Thicket. When using 4WD's deflate your tyres to correct sand pressures for your vehicle to prevent track damage. Do not ride trail bikes or quad vehicles in the dunal areas, and report these illegal activities promptly to City of Mandurah, or DPAW, rangers.