Copyright © Bouvard Coast Care Group Inc - Registered Not for Profit Organisation
Designed by Westcountry
Bouvard Coast Care Group
Working for the future to protect our coastal dune system, fauna and wildlife

Possum Group

Our Possum Group look after the Western Ring-tail Possums and the Gumnut Possum Bridge. The western ringtail possum (Ngwayir) is an arboreal leaf-eating herbivorous marsupial endemic to south-western Australia. Since colonial settlement it has undergone a substantial range contraction, with declines in abundance and habitat continuing. It is listed as threatened fauna, and ranked in Western Australia as Endangered under international (IUCN) criteria.  It is also listed nationally as Vulnerable under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act). Bouvard Coastcare Group in partnership with the City of Mandurah and Friends of Warrangup Springs successfully applied for funding to the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council for “Restoring Ecological Linkages for the Ngwayir (Western Ringtail Possum)” In addition, we have also carried out planting along a number of wildlife corridors in Bouvard to provide food & habitat for the Western Ring-tailed Possum. The Possum Group carry on this work, managing, maintaining and monitoring possum numbers in the area.

You can join this group by contacting: Jason  possums@bouvardcoastcare.org.au

BOUVARD COASTCARE POSSUM GROUP

Bouvard Wildlife Corridor Planting Day

A great turnout on Sunday 13th August 17 with 24 participants to plant 65 peppermint trees through two wildlife corridors in Bouvard. Click on an image for a larger photo
Read the article in the Mandurah Mail

Citizen Science - Spotlighting

All you need is a good head torch! The most important work of the possum group is the monitor the number of ringtail possums in the area, so why not join a spotlighting event and spent a couple of hours finding and recording these wonderful animals. In a recent spotlight in Corridor A, we spotted no less than 20 ringtails with 5 babes. Spotting the babes is of particular significance as it tells us that the population is reproducing which for a critically endangered species is vitally important. We need to ID our possums, then we record what the possum is doing, how many possums in the tree, what species of tree are they in, the time and date and the quadrant its located in. We have forms that make the recording easy. It’s very exciting and if you join a group doing a location nearby regularly you’ll get to know the possums routines and that may give you a heads up as to when something may be wrong or changing – these are vital observations.
Copyright © Bouvard Coast Care Group Inc - Registered Not for Profit Organisation
Designed by Westcountry
Bouvard Coast Care Group
Working for the future to protect our coastal dune system, fauna and wildlife

Possum Group

Our Possum Group look after the Western Ring-tail Possums and the Gumnut Possum Bridge. The western ringtail possum (Ngwayir) is an arboreal leaf-eating herbivorous marsupial endemic to south-western Australia. Since colonial settlement it has undergone a substantial range contraction, with declines in abundance and habitat continuing. It is listed as threatened fauna, and ranked in Western Australia as Endangered under international (IUCN) criteria.  It is also listed nationally as Vulnerable under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act). Bouvard Coastcare Group in partnership with the City of Mandurah and Friends of Warrangup Springs successfully applied for funding to the Peel- Harvey Catchment Council for “Restoring Ecological Linkages for the Ngwayir (Western Ringtail Possum)” In addition, we have also carried out planting along a number of wildlife corridors in Bouvard to provide food & habitat for the Western Ring-tailed Possum. The Possum Group carry on this work, managing, maintaining and monitoring possum numbers in the area.

You can join this group by

contacting: Jason  

possums@bouvardcoastcare.org.au

Citizen Science - Spotlighting

All you need is a good head torch! The most important work of the possum group is the monitor the number of ringtail possums in the area, so why not join a spotlighting event and spent a couple of hours finding and recording these wonderful animals. In a recent spotlight in Corridor A, we spotted no less than 20 ringtails with 5 babes. Spotting the babes is of particular significance as it tells us that the population is reproducing which for a critically endangered species is vitally important. We need to ID our possums, then we record what the possum is doing, how many possums in the tree, what species of tree are they in, the time and date and the quadrant its located in. We have forms that make the recording easy. It’s very exciting and if you join a group doing a location nearby regularly you’ll get to know the possums routines and that may give you a heads up as to when something may be wrong or changing – these are vital observations.